small world :: byd bach
Shakespeare Tragedies Renamed for the Modern tumblr Teen

my-tardis-sense-is-tingling:

Titus Andronicus: "Well That Escalated Quickly"
Romeo and Juliet: "Shut Up, You’re Like 12"
Julius Caesar: "I Came Out Here to Run the Roman Empire and I Am Honestly Feeling So Attacked Right Now"
Hamlet: "[AGGRESSIVELY PRETENDS TO GO INSANE AND IN THE PROCESS GOES ACTUALLY INSANE MAYBE]"
Othello: "Othello: Is my wife cheating on me?? Iago: Bitch, she might be."
King Lear: "Shows Up To Realization of Commonality with Humanity and Renouncement of Titles as Identity-Definers 15 Years Late With Starbucks"
Macbeth: "Did It For the Vine"
Antony and Cleopatra: "Much Rome. Very Egypt. Such Different. Wow."

machynlleth in 1929 — in colour!

wibbleclarkeblog:

Michael Sheen = top notch.

now mash this up with the silent village!

16

16. A film you love but everyone else hates?

dark harbor. it’s so awful it’s mindblowingly great!

nobody wants to play.

FILM ASK GAME

badwollf:

  1. What’s the most depressing movie you’ve ever watched? 
  2. What’s the most disturbing movie you’ve ever watched?
  3. An actor/actress you’ve seen in more than 8 movies? Name the movies.
  4. A film you could watch on repeat for the rest of your life?
  5. What’s the very first film you remember watching?
  6. A film you wish you hadn’t watched?
  7. A film you wish had a sequel?
  8. Which book would you like to see adapted into a film?
  9. The most aesthetically pleasing movie you’ve ever watched?
  10. What’s your favourite movie director?
  11. Your favourite movie genre?
  12. A movie that holds a special place in your heart? 
  13. Your favourite comedy film?
  14. A music video you would love to see developed into a film?
  15. A film everyone loves but you hate?
  16. A film you love but everyone else hates?
  17. Which cinematic universe would you like to live in?
  18. What’s your favourite biopic?
  19. Mainstream movies or indie movies?
  20. Old movies or contemporary movies?
  21. A film with an amazing soundtrack?
A brilliant linguist, fluent in a variety of European and Eastern language, Dr Hermann Ethé was a far from typical resident of Aberystwyth. When he first arrived in the town in 1875 the college was only very small, and the populace far from cosmopolitan in outlook. To the pious, teetotal townspeople it could not be quite overlooked that this German enjoyed drinking beer, even on a Sunday, and especially enjoyed dancing.

Although widely respected amongst scholars and students, when war was declared Hermann Ethe, along with other Germans living and working in the town, inevitably fell under suspicion. After all, he had never ever applied for British Citizenship; worse, in August 1914 he was actually in Germany, enjoying his annual holiday.

By October of that year, with reports of atrocities in Belgium, anti-German sentiments were running high. On Wednesday 14th October, Dr Ethé and his English-born wife returned to the town with the consent of authorities, resulting in the college becomming slightly anxious. The principal of the college, together with the registrar, the librarian, and a student representative went down to the railway station to greet him, and to secure ‘safe passage’. A small crowd of protesters booed.

The next day, however, something far more sinister occurred. Type-written slips were passed from hand to hand reading: “As a protest against the return of Dr Ethé from Germany to teach in our Welsh national intistution we intend to form a procession of workmen and others at one o’clock near Shiloh Chapel”. By the appointed hour, a crowd of some 2,000 people had appeared at Shiloh, and were addressed by two respected town councillors: T.J. Samuel, a local solicitor who would go on to become mayor, and Dr T.D.Harries, a GP and former mayor. These gentlemen urged the mob to march on Dr Ethé’s house, and give him twenty-four hours’ notice to clear out, or else force him out.

Led by Enoch Davies, a commercial traveller, the crowd then marched up the hill towards Caradoc Road and forced open a window of Dr Ethe’s house, and – the professor being out of the house - harangued the professor’s wife. Despite her pleas that her husband had been granted a British Passport, and that she had a brother fighting the Germans, the crowd wasn’t satisfied. Dr and Mrs Ethé must get out, or they would tear down the house stone by stone.

Dr Ethé left that very night, never to return. After staying with his wife’s family in Reading the couple moved to Clifton, near Bristol. The College did all in their power to support Hermann Ethe, but they were powerless to resist vindictive calls to stop the lecturer’s pension (even one of his former students turned on him), and this respected scholar died in 1917, broken and in poverty.

Location: Caradoc Road, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, SY23 2LB

abstractandbriefchronicles:

bydbach:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?

Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.

English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 

This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 

A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 

Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

image

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

don’t be guilt-tripped by intentionally bad design (that visually continues to push women to the side) as marketting strategy to buy someone’s product, or: “if your product were any good you wouldn’t need sexism to sell it.”

the thing i don’t get is what the body shop are actually advertising here

their own image as anti-sexist, feminist, ethically correct company whose products you can buy without feeling bad about your desire for personal grooming, but who wants you to ignore their advertising that is entirely grounded in visual codes of sexism? — it’s basically like going to starbucks in order to pacify your guilt-tripped conscience for not exploiting coffee farmers in developing countries while that same company can’t really be bothered about pushing small, local, family-run businesses out of the competition.

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?
Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.
English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 
This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 
A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 
Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

don’t be guilt-tripped by intentionally bad design (that visually continues to push women to the side) as marketting strategy to buy someone’s product, or: “if your product were any good you wouldn’t need sexism to sell it.”

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?

Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.

English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 

This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 

A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 

Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

image

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

don’t be guilt-tripped by intentionally bad design (that visually continues to push women to the side) as marketting strategy to buy someone’s product, or: “if your product were any good you wouldn’t need sexism to sell it.”

baelor:

i hate my linear algebra textbook.